Tick Tock Trans Mountain Clock

Will the new B.C. government create delays on the approved Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion? Can Canada make it to new markets in time to satisfy Asia's growing needs?  


What’s Up.

Following the surprising outcome from the B.C. elections, Canadians are drawing concern over what will happen with the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion.  The expansion will parallel the 1,150-km route of the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline, which was built in 1953 and is the only West Coast link for Western Canadian oil. Pipeline capacity will increase from 300,000 to 890,000 barrels of oil per day and generate almost $50B in government revenues for the benefit of Canadians in the first 20 years.

Broken Down.

After a thorough review by the National Energy Board, Canada's federal government approved the pipeline indicating that new energy markets are in Canada’s best interest. However, stakeholders predict the new B.C. government could delay the process further, making it difficult for Canada to export its energy to new markets.

Broken Down Even More. 

Time is of the essence as further delays may jeopardize trade opportunities in Asia, as other producing nations such as Russia are eager to fill the demand. Back in 2014, Russia negotiated a $400B gas deal for a 30 year supply to Asian markets.  

Will the new B.C. government create delays on the approved Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion? Can Canada make it to new markets in time to satisfy Asia's growing needs?  
   

Britni WestonComment